Friday, October 10, 2014

Painting with Kinders

In my heart of hearts, I believe MAKING the secondary colors is more beneficial to the learning and comprehending of how two primary colors can mix to create a new (secondary) color.  But, man...does it take a lot (physically) out of me.  EVERY year, I have done this activity in relation to some lesson using secondary color paper.  This year, I was at a meeting one day (away from school) and that one class had to miss the physical painting day.  I'm starting to wonder if just using the secondary colors, reading Mouse Paint, completing the color worksheet might be almost sufficient for teaching this concept.  It sure would be a lot easier in years to come.

But I don't want to, have never wanted to, and hope to never be that teacher that wants to take the easy way out.  So, over six months pregnant, I've spent the last week (well, four classes!) running around, refilling paint trays, doing three demos in one class time, monitoring the drying rack, cleaning the brushes, cleaning up spilled water containers (only one this week!) and, what seems like so much more.  All in a 45 minutes period!

After each class, I'm literally panting.  My next class has, very kindly, asked if I was okay and if my baby was making me look all sweaty (oh, was that how I looked?).

Regardless, I love teaching this.  It's NOT a quiet lesson.  The kids squeal with delight when they do the mixing and create their own new colors.  I love the comments about how some people's purple looks more red and others looks more blue (from Kindergarteners!!).  I love the proud delight I hear in their voices when they show me "their" orange and how it's different than their neighbor's.

Here's a peak into this glorious painting mayhem:




1 comment:

  1. Hahaha I love your description of your exhausting class. I can only imagine how much more tiring it must be whilst preggo! Kudos to you for making it through! I think the "chaotic" lessons are the most fun. The kids seem to get a lot more out of these types of super-involved and super messy lessons. How fun!

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